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11.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2016
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)1,2
Número páginas56
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_RE_Capacity_Statistics_2016.pdf
Resumen/Abstract Los datos de capacidad de generación eléctrica con energías renovables que se muestran en el presente documento representan la capacidad máxima de generación neta de las centrales
eléctricas y otras instalaciones que utilizan fuentes de energías renovables para producir electricidad. Para la mayoría de los países y las tecnologías, los datos reflejan la capacidad instalada y conectada al final del año natural. Los datos se presentan en megavatios (MW) redondeados al megavatio entero más cercano, con cifras entre cero y 0.5MW representadas como un 0.  
Palabras claveEnergía de biomasa; Energía eólica; Energía geotérmica; Energía hidroeléctrica; Energía solar fotovoltaica; Estadísticas; Generación de energía; Nivel mundial
 
12.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)15,5
Número páginas80
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_RE_Desalination_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract Many islands face shortages of fresh water. Desalination using renewable energy can meet their water needs at reduced costs, this report finds.
Desalination methods such as reverse osmosis (RO) or multi-effect distillation (MED) can be combined with solar photovoltaic (PV) or concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies. RO also works with wind power. While cost comparisons vary from island to island, all of these promising technologies pairings can be competitive against fossils fuels for desalination systems producing 250 cubic meters of potable water per day, a viable scale for many island communities. Follow-up studies can help to define the most suitable renewable desalination options for specific islands. IRENA produced the report using the expertise of Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy ISE.  
Palabras claveAgua; Desalinización; Energía eólica; Energía solar fotovoltaica; Islas
 
13.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)2,7
Número páginas60
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_QI_2_SWTs_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract This guide is part of a series prepared by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) in the field of quality infrastructure (QI) for small-scale renewable energy technologies. Quality
Infrastructure for Renewable Energy Technologies: Small Wind Turbines analyses the challenges and offers recommendations for developing QI for small wind turbines (SWTs), as well as highlighting the experiences of several countries in developing and implementing QI for SWTs. The SWT guide concludes by applying guidelines for incrementally developing QI to the particular case of SWT markets.  
Palabras claveEnergía eólica; Guías generales; Infraestructura; Mejores prácticas; Mercados de energía; Turbinas eólicas
 
14.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)1,8
Número páginas36
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_Off-grid_Renewable_Systems_WP_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract With more than a billion people lacking access to electricity, local power-generation solutions are essential to provide sustainable energy to all - particularly those consumers expected to remain
isolated from national or regional grids for the foreseeable future. Renewable power generation provides low-cost solutions to bring reliable electricity to rural households or island communities off the main grid. But while off-grid renewable energy systems are expanding rapidly on the ground, data that systematically tracks this progress remains limited. This working paper from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) provides an overview of current data sources for off-grid renewable energy systems. It suggests methodological improvements to help categorise such systems, evaluate and aggregate data and measure progress in deployment. The working paper comes as IRENA’s contribution to the Global Tracking Framework of the Sustainable Energy for All (SE4ALL) initiative.  
Palabras claveEnergía eólica; Energía hidroeléctrica; Energía solar; Sistemas aislados
 
15.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)1,0
Número páginas16
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_Baseload_to_Peak_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract Solar and wind power continue expanding, constituting almost 40% of newly installed power capacity worldwide in 2014. But taking the energy transition to the next level – to a system primarily based
on renewable sources – calls for a fundamental change in how power generation, transmission and distribution are planned and managed. In particular, it requires rethinking the concept of “baseload” power plants. This working paper from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) addresses the oft-heard critique that power generation based on variable renewable resources, such as sunshine and wind, is unsuitable to provide baseload supply. Yet as the paper shows, constructing new baseload power plants constrains the development of the future power generation mix. A flexible generation mix, enhanced grid infrastructure, demand-side options and energy storage can all be combined effectively with variable renewables to ensure reliable power supply. The working paper was presented during IRENA’s roundtable meeting, “Power System Transformation and the Utility of the Future”, at the Clean Energy Ministerial in Mérida, Mexico, in May 2015.  
Palabras claveCarga base; Carga máxima; Energía eólica; Energía solar
 
16.
 
InstituciónGlobal Wind Energy Council (GWEC)
Publicado Brussels, 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)4,6
Número páginas80
Descargar bajo http://www.gwec.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/GWEC_Global_Wind_2014_Report_LR.pdf
Resumen/Abstract The Global Wind Energy Council launched its flagship publication the Global Wind Report: Annual Market update today in Istanbul. The report details wind power’s remarkable growth in 2014, as well as
updating GWEC’s rolling 5 year market projections, which show continued growth for the rest of the decade. Led by China and Brazil in the first instance, as well as Mexico and South Africa, non-OECD markets outstripped the traditional markets in Europe and North America again in 2014. China installed an astonishing 23 GW of new wind power last year, bringing its cumulative total to more than 114 GW, and Brazil was the world’s 4th largest market in 2014, and entered the top 10 in cumulative rankings for the first time. The African market took off in 2014, and Germany, Chile, Canada and Turkey also had record years. “Wind power’s growth is increasingly driven by its competitive pricing, as well as because it enhances energy security, price stability and (especially in China) through the need to address the choking smog that is increasingly making major urban areas in the developing world unliveable, said Steve Sawyer, GWEC Secretary General. “The need for clean, sustainable indigenous power sources to fuel economic growth throughout Africa, Asia and Latin America is increasingly being met through wind power, and this will continue for the foreseeable future”. The US market recovered in 2014 from a dismal 2013, and looks set for at least another two strong years, as does Canada. Germany’s record installations led an increasingly concentrated European market. Looking ahead, GWEC expects the 2015 market to top 50 GW again in 2015, and reach 60 GW per year by 2018. Growth will continue to be led by China, which seems on track to meet its 200 GW well ahead of the government’s target of 2020; and the Indian market is expected to grow substantially in the years ahead. Latin America is becoming a strong regional market, led by Brazil, but with Mexico catching up quickly. Africa installed nearly 1 GW in 2014 for the first time, and we expect it to pass that mark in 2015 and not look back. Led by South Africa, Egypt and Morocco, we look for a number of new markets to emerge in the coming years which will make Africa the fastest growing regional market, at least in percentage terms, in the coming years. Europe is expected to remain relatively stable, and North America is the most difficult market to predict as policy vacuums loom in both the US and Canada in 2016 or thereafter. “Looking ahead to the UN climate summit in Paris at the end of the year, we call on governments to wake up to the renewable energy revolution in the power sector, and set ambitious targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions”, concluded Sawyer.  
Palabras claveEnergía eólica; Estadísticas; Nivel mundial
 
17.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)3,1
Número páginas60
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_Battery_Storage_report_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract Energy storage capabilities are crucial for the integration of high levels variable renewable sources, such as solar and wind energy, onto the power grid. This report shows that battery storage
technologies for renewable energy are already cost-competitive for island and rural applications. Furthermore, the market for battery storage systems coupled with rooftop solar panels has started growing rapidly. The report is accompanied by 12 case studies on battery storage systems around the world  
Palabras claveBaterías para almacenar la energía; Energía eólica; Energía solar; Estudio de caso; Nivel mundial; Sistemas aislados
 
18.
 
InstituciónInternational Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)8,9
Número páginas68
Descargar bajo http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_GlobalAtlas_World_of_Renewables_2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract The Global Atlas for Renewable Energy (Global Atlas) aims to close the gap between countries with access to the datasets, expertise and financial support to evaluate their renewable energy potential,
and those lacking such elements. As of January 2015, a total of 67 countries and more than 50 institutes and partners were contributing to the initiative, which is coordinated by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The Global Atlas facilitates a first screening for areas of opportunity for more detailed assessments. It enables the user to overlay information listed in a catalogue of more than 1,000 datasets, and to identify areas of interest for further prospection. This brochure presents an extract of the datasets hosted by the Global Atlas. All information in the booklet is also available through the Global Atlas interface, where IRENA is continuously adding information to the system. The interface includes maps on solar, wind, geothermal and bioenergy resources, along with one marine energy map. The datasets will eventually encompass all renewable energy resources, providing the first-ever global coverage in a resource-assessment atlas of this kind. IRENA is grateful to the data providers of the Global Atlas for making this publication possible.  
Palabras claveEnergía de biomasa; Energía eólica; Energía geotérmica; Energía solar; Energías renovables; Potenciales
 
19.
 
InstituciónRenewables-Now Aktiengesellschaft, Switzerland; ETH Zurich, Switzerland
Publicado 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)0,2
Número páginas6
Descargar bajo http://www.renewables-now.ch/20150618_Volkwein_Preprint_ICEE2015.pdf
Resumen/Abstract The SolarSuperState Ranking 2011 is the first ranking of all 196 states of the world based on the capacity per population for the two categories wind energy and photovoltaic usage. The reporting date
is 31 December 2010. The cumulative installed capacity, the cumulative installed capacity per population, and the world rank are given as figures. Most top ten ranks in both rankings wind and solar are crowded by European states, no one by an African state. At the world level, exceptional states are Denmark (world rank 1 in category wind), Vatican City State (world rank 1 in category solar), Germany (in the top ten lists of both categories wind and solar), Spain (in the top ten lists of both categories wind and solar). In the whole world, there exists only one state cluster for each of the two categories wind and solar with many top ten states. In the center of these two clusters is always Germany.  
Palabras claveEnergía eólica; Energía solar fotovoltaica; Estadísticas; Ranking global del uso de la tecnología
 
20.
 
Institución
Publicado German Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) , 2015
Título de la serie
ISBN o ISSN
Tamaño del Archivo (MB)2,5
Número páginas84
Descargar bajo http://www.bmwi.de/English/Redaktion/Pdf/renewable-energy-sources-in-figures-2014,property=pdf,bereich=bmwi2012,sprache=en,rwb=true.pdf
Resumen/Abstract In the 15th edition of its publication “Renewable Energy Sources in Figures – National and International Development”, the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy reports on the
expansion of renewable energy in Germany, in the European Union and worldwide in 2014.  
Palabras claveAlemania; Energía de biomasa; Energía eólica; Energía geotérmica; Energía hidroeléctrica; Energía solar; Estadísticas; Europa; Extensión de energías renovables
 
 
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